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Former coach Brigitte Cecelia to run for PPC in federal election

“I am running this time as a candidate in the federal election to represent the voice of the average Albertans, the average Canadian, and that's how I see myself,” she said.
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Brigitte Cecelia is representing the People's Party of Canada for the St. Albert-Edmonton riding. SUPPLIED/Photo

Freedom of speech and fiscal integrity are the top concerns for the People’s Party of Canada candidate who is looking to win a seat in the federal election on Sept. 20.

Brigitte Cecelia is running for a second time in the St. Albert-Edmonton riding and she is hoping to bring awareness to her party.

Cecelia has been a St. Albert resident for around 30 years. She is currently on bereavement leave from work, but normally she keeps two separate manager positions in St. Albert, although she declined to say where.

“Normally, I'm employed … I work on temporary projects as well. I like to keep busy, obviously,” she said.

Cecelia just finished her third term with the Pastoral Council for the Basilica in Edmonton and will be stepping down. She serves on many boards and committees but the last year has made that difficult to do.

She said her heart also lies with the fitness industry. She said she loved working in the past as a certified competitive swimming and triathlon coach.

Cecelia said she is running in this election because she is a long-time passionate advocate for freedom of speech.

“I am running this time as a candidate in the federal election to represent the voice of the average Albertans, the average Canadian, and that's how I see myself,” she said.

As for the fiscal integrity part of the platform, Cecelia said they are the only party that does not plan to carry a deficit.

In 2019, the People's Party of Canada (PPC) campaigned on the promise they would eliminate the deficit in two years. This year, with COVID-19, they're goal is to eliminate the deficit in four years by cutting corporate welfare, such as the foreign development aid, and defunding the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Cecelia said.

The party will look cutting funding to programs that are provincial and municipal responsibilities, along with reviewing tax measures they find inefficient. The party is also looking into the redistribution of wealth, Cecelia said.

The PPC is advocating for smaller government, unity within Canada, and fair equalization payments. Cecelia said the party is the only one who will “uphold the principles of freedom.”