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Seven vie for Legal town council

It’s a seven-horse race for Legal town council after two newcomers stepped forward to challenge incumbents. Trina Jones and Lisa Magera both filed nomination papers Monday in their bids to secure one of five council seats.

It’s a seven-horse race for Legal town council after two newcomers stepped forward to challenge incumbents.

Trina Jones and Lisa Magera both filed nomination papers Monday in their bids to secure one of five council seats. They’re joined in the race by incumbents Mayor Albert St. Jean, Ken Baril, Gena Bennett, Phil Hughes and Cassandra Ouellette.

Jones, 32, acknowledges the solid job council has done over the last three years but stepped forward out of a desire to give back to the community she’s called home off and on since high school. Jones has served on several school and recreation committees and felt town council was the next logical step.

“Town council overrides everything so I thought I could help out more.”

Jones, a web developer, wants to focus on economic development to promote the town’s business and residential sectors, both to the region and current residents.

“It could use a lot of improvement — especially in the promotional areas — especially just to get people to do their shopping locally.”

Magera, 31, also lists community service as the driving force behind her political run. The local teacher and chair of the Fête au Village for the last six years says reduced working hours allows her to get more involved.

As the parent of two children, Magera says the town needs to do something about the absence of family doctors practising in Legal. The closest family doctor is in Morinville.

“It’s been a challenge for parents with young kids and our elderly,” she says.

The long-time resident says more work can be done involving youth in the community, and likes the idea of creating a spray park for younger kids. She too wants more emphasis placed on getting the word out about Legal as a place to live and work.

St. Jean, 43, is seeking a third term on town council. He wants to continue work initiated during this term, including addressing the town’s badly aging roads, curbs and underground utilities.

“There are still some projects that we started in the last term that haven’t been completed, so we need to go finish those,” he said, referring to capital projects initiated with the aid of the provincial Municipal Sustainability Initiative Program. “Infrastructure in some places is 50 years old, 60 years old,” he said.

St. Jean, a salesman by trade, is proud of council’s work to keep finances in order while improving parks, trails and playgrounds, but says town amenities suffer from an “age gap.” He’d like to continue efforts to create a skateboard park giving local teens another place to enjoy.

The election will determine which five candidates get to serve on council, but it’s up to councillors to choose the deputy mayor and mayor. St. Jean says he’s pleased with the amount of interest in public office and is ready to start door knocking early next month.

“It’s always good when you have an election. It doesn’t do any good to anybody if you’re automatically put in.”

The municipal election is Oct. 18.