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Six candidates face off for votes

Six candidates battled it out for votes in St. Albert just days before voters head to the polls to cast their votes. All six candidates came to the St. Albert and District Chamber of Commerce forum fat the St.
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Six federal candidates battled it out for votes in St. Albert just days before voters head to the polls to cast their votes.

All six St. Albert-Edmonton candidates came to the St. Albert and District Chamber of Commerce forum at the St. Albert Inn Thursday to sell voters on their vision for the future.

Incumbent Conservative candidate Michael Cooper touted his record in office, citing his time on the justice committee, the passing of Wynn’s law and a jury secrecy support bill through second reading, and the work he has done in the community.

“I have fought for the issues and priorities that matter to people of this riding,” Cooper said

Gregory Springate, Liberal Party candidate, reminded residents of the accomplishments his party has made over the last four years.

Springate told the crowd that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberal government was so committed to building the TransMountain pipeline that they bought the entire thing for $4.5 billion.

“I believe that better is always possible, and as a chartered professional accountant, I will take your concerns to Ottawa,” Springate said.

Kathleen Mpulubusi, candidate for the NDP, asked the crowd to stop sending conservative voices to Ottawa.

“A major problem is, for decades we've had wave after wave of conservative MPs go to Ottawa. And then we wonder why Alberta voices are not heard in Ottawa. It's either Alberta is taken for granted or were ignored,” Mpulubusi said.

Rob Dunbar of the Green Party spoke about how his party does not whip votes, so he would be able to be a true voice for the riding in Ottawa.

“I need to vote for the constituents' voice, and if the constituents here in Alberta saw fit to (put me in) office, I would have to vote for pipelines because that is what people here want.”

Brigitte Cecelia, candidate for the People’s Party of Canada, made it clear her party’s first priority would be to pay down the national debt as soon as possible. Cecelia spent the night introducing her party to the public.

“Our first priority is to manage our debt. Our credit card is full,” Cecelia said.

Robert Fraser of the Veterans Coalition Party of Canada spoke about the importance of taking care of the most vulnerable people in society, boosting CPP, cutting MP pensions, recognizing and honouring all treaties with First Nations, helping students with their high debt and being a global leader in tackling man-made climate change.

“We understand the man-made emissions need to be curtailed and the Canadian industry is a leader in that research, we will reach out to the industry leaders and make Canada the first zero emission country and also export our technology to countries that have no intention on cleaning up their act,” Fraser said.

Canadians head to the polls to vote on Oct. 21.


Jennifer Henderson

About the Author: Jennifer Henderson

Jennifer Henderson joined the St. Albert Gazette in 2016. She writes about municipal, provincial and federal politics; court and crime; general news and features.
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