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LETTER: Some problems with virtual Parliament

"It amplifies self-consciousness, and especially confines people to a time constraint that forces a scripted presentation, rather than any spontaneous, and real, feelings."
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I read the letter regarding the benefits of virtual Parliament ("Virtual Parliament makes good sense," June 3 Gazette).

The problems are much more than the efficiency of a meeting.

It has been my experience that the environment of shared space lends itself more to compromise, influencing ideas, and most important, inspiration derived from the moment.

The technology forces the “wait your turn” which suppresses creativity and passion. It amplifies self-consciousness, and especially confines people to a time constraint that forces a scripted presentation, rather than any spontaneous, and real, feelings.

(I do concede we have seen more of this in recent times, even in the live setting.)

The real change comes outside the meeting. I have experienced more changes of minds at the coffee station in the break area outside a meeting than in.

Video conferencing isolates, spending more time with those that agree with you than disagree. That’s bad for government, and bad for the taxpayer.

Alan Otway

Morinville




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