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LETTER: Statistically, it might not be you!

"So thinking statistically that COVID-19 might not happen to you because you know you are healthy may give you a false sense of security."
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It was interesting to read all the statistics collated for us by D. Mountenay concerning COVID-19 ("An open letter to politicians and the media on COVID-19," Sept. 16 Gazette). The problem with statistics is they are cold hard facts and they can be manipulated to prove points. It was interesting to see statistics about abortion and smoking which provide us with a glimpse of the writer's bias.

Yes we are fearful, we do not really know where this virus hides among us. We have some clues: where people are crowded together, where cleanliness is not a priority, where weak immune systems make us vulnerable. Therefore we should do things that might hinder the spread: give people space, wear a mask as this can help, sanitize our environment. How do we know who is healthy, when some people are asymptomatic? Washing our hands and ensuring that we take vitamins and supplements to strengthen us could certainly help.Telling us that only 0.00550684 of the Alberta population has died, the average age is 83 years old, does not really help some of us. So if this is around in six years I will be dead!

Why are we afraid? Because we have no control. If a vaccine can be developed, this could prove vital, but in the meantime if we want to see what happens when rules and regulations are sporadically in place, where people crowd together and do not wear masks, just look to the south of us across the border.

Finally, nothing hits home more when you become a statistic. Forty-five years ago, my first child was born with a rare heart defect – he was one in 10,000 – no one knew why this happened and of course nowadays there have been so many advances, this is not really a problem. Back then it was!

So thinking statistically that COVID-19 might not happen to you because you know you are healthy may give you a false sense of security. Wear a mask – please.

Elizabeth Allchin, St. Albert




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